A lot of exciting conversation is taking place around the water cooler here at CommScope since our recent press release announcing the successful demonstration of next generation Category 8 cabling at the International Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 802.3 NGBASE-T study group meeting in Phoenix, Ariz. All components for this demonstration were developed by CommScope engineering staff and are compliant with the draft ANSI/TIA-568-C.2-1 specifications.  To recognize advances in technology and harmonize with TIA, ISO/IEC/JTC1/SC25/WG3 also adapted the names Category 8.1 and 8.2 for components used to build Class I and Class II channels in support of 40 G applications.

One important thing to note is why the feasibility of using twisted-pair-copper cabling (with RJ-45 connectors) to support 40Gb/s is so critical to the overall market. The RJ-45 connector is with no doubt one of the most common connector types used in data networks. As the market continues to grow from 1 Gb/s to 10 Gb/s, the backward compatibility of this technology will continue to be of extreme importance as work continues towards 40 Gb/s. This will allow data center operators to evolve their networks based on changing requirements and do so with the least amount of disruption and cost to their networks. 

Additionally, twisted-pair-copper cabling has proven to be an extremely cost effective solution and designers, installers, and customers have a lot of experience and confidence in copper-based networks. While the eventual deployment of 40G-based copper solutions is still a few years out, this technology will allow organizations to think about how they are deploying copper based solutions today with an eye to the future. Doing so correctly will help ensure infrastructure costs are well managed from both a product and support standpoint.

I am really pleased to hear what my peers have had to say about this latest concept and would like to know what you think.

About the Author

David Oldenbuttel

David Oldenbuttel is Strategic Marketing Manager for the Enterprise division at CommScope. He has worked in the technology industry for the past 14 years in a variety of management and product marketing roles for firms such as IBM and Fujitsu. David has a bachelor’s degree in marketing from Texas Tech University and an MBA from the University of Dallas.

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Comments

3 comments for "Tried and True RJ45 Connects Tomorrow's 40G Technology"
David Oldenbuttel

Thanks David, excellent point. CommScope strongly supports this objective and is striving in all the committees to make it happen. My colleagues who activily work in the standards bodies tell me that TIA TR42.7 is communicating and coordinating with the IEC 46C cable committee and IEC 48B connector committee where new projects for Category 8 cables and connectors have already started. Additionally, ISO WG3 has also just started communication and coordinating with the same IEC committees so we are all shooting for the “singular standard” objective for Category 8 cables and connectors. Stay tuned … more news regarding this will be coming.

David Stefanowicz

I think that 40Gbps over copper is a super achievement, particularly with a backwards compatible RJ45 connector - most impressive and well done Commscope. However, datacomms is becoming increasingly complex, particularly for the poor old installer! In order to make this super achievement a real winner what we need is the TIA and IEC to develop a singular standard to ensure that the industry moves forward in the simplest of ways covering Category 8 cables and connectors.

GFI Norte

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