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A Look Back at 2016: Data Center of the Future - Two outages that changed the course of history (Part 2)

Posted by Jennifer Sweeper on December 29, 2016

Data Center_FutureEditor’s Note: As we say good-bye to 2016, we look back at some of our most shared blogs of the year. We covered a wide range of network infrastructure topics, and we hope you enjoy revisiting some of these popular posts. This blog appeared on August 1, 2016, as a second post about the data center of the future (see Part One). It is a post by guest blogger Jennifer Sweeper, partner marketing manager at Digital Realty. The opinions and comments provided in this guest post, as with all posts to CommScope Blogs, are that of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of CommScope.

When you operate a global internet enterprise company, the last thing you need is a data center outage. The very last thing you need is two outages in just three months. That’s exactly what happened to the internet company’s data center provider that wasn’t equipped for a big data surge.

A 2013 Gartner study says big data is expected to grow 800 percent in the next few years, data centers like these need to be ready. And many are not. We have connected lifestyles, and the Internet of Things (IoT) will only get bigger than it is now.


A Look Back at 2016: How to Power Today’s Internet of Things

Posted by Arria Giulan on December 28, 2016

Security-camera-compEditor’s Note: As we say good-bye to 2016, we look back at some of our most shared blogs of the year. We covered a wide range of network infrastructure topics, and we hope you enjoy revisiting some of these popular posts. This blog first appeared on June 29, 2016.

There is great excitement about the capabilities of a connected world delivering higher operational performance, increased efficiencies and better overall user experience with the Internet of Things (IoT). Gartner projects there will be almost 21 billion IoT devices in use by 2020. But the IoT is more than a vision for the future; it is here today, delivering on its promise.


A Look Back at 2016: How Multiplexing Techniques Enable Higher Speeds On Fiber Optic Cabling

Posted by James Donovan on December 27, 2016

Fiber_Cable_SmallEditor’s Note: As we say good-bye to 2016, we look back at some of our most shared blogs of the year. We covered a wide range of network infrastructure topics, and we hope you enjoy revisiting some of these popular posts. This blog first appeared on July 25, 2016.

Different multiplexing technologies are enabling the evolution of network speeds on fiber optic cabling. Such technologies include time division, space division and wavelength division multiplexing. Let’s take a closer look at each.


A Look Back at 2016: What Is C-RAN?

Posted by Mike Wolfe on December 26, 2016
C-RAN-compressed

Editor’s Note: As we say good-bye to 2016, we look back at some of our most shared blogs of the year. We covered a wide range of network infrastructure topics, and we hope you enjoy revisiting some of these popular posts. This blog first appeared on June 17, 2016.

Though this blog post is an attempt to define C-RAN—an acronym commonly heard in the wireless industry these days—the term does in fact have a couple of different meanings. The C in C-RAN stands for both “centralized” radio access network (RAN) and also “cloud-based” RAN. They are related concepts, and both involve a new architecture for the network equipment at cell sites.

The trend toward C-RAN is still fairly new, having started just a few years ago by China Mobile. But other network operators around the world are already actively deploying Centralized RAN networks with an eye towards increasing their commitment as the market matures.


A Look Back at 2016: Do You Want To Speed Up Fiber Installations At The Premises?

Posted by Joseph P. Depa III on December 23, 2016

Editor’s Note: As we say good-bye to 2016, we look back at some of our most shared blogs of the year. We covered a wide range of network infrastructure topics, and we hope you enjoy revisiting some of these popular posts. This blog first appeared on March 14, 2016.

Trends in fiber optic deployments are moving toward a network architecture that drives fiber deeper to various stages of the FTTx network, and ultimately into individual homes. Equipment providers need to offer solutions that address the larger challenges of meeting targeted budgets while still addressing shorter timelines for fiber deployments. Customers also want complete product offerings streamlined to meet their full end-to-end architecture needs.

Optical fiber continues to gain popularity as one of the best broadband mediums for future-proofing against higher and faster capacity requirements by end users. While some have concluded the existence of optical connectivity in multi-dwelling units (MDUs)office buildings and even single-family units (SFU) may increase property values fiber connectivity as part of the building structure has become an expected service for users.


Safety, Security and Stability in Smart Buildings

Posted by Philip Sorrells on December 22, 2016

Security--compThis blog post is part of a series about intelligent buildings based on content from the CommScope Connected and Efficient Buildings ebook.

I wrote a blog last year about integrating safety, security and stability into the design and construction of the “Building of the Future.” My message was to address those topics early on, when the cost to implement them is likely as inexpensive as it could ever be.

Now – going on two years later – I feel pretty good about that advice.  In the past two years, we have seen many real-world examples of how planning, designing and implementing solutions for these “Three S’s” in advance have made a positive impact. Unfortunately, we’ve also seen many examples where not having addressed these considerations has had costly consequences.


Top 10 CommScope Innovations: Outside Plant Closure Solutions

Posted by Christiaan Radelet on December 21, 2016

Top_40_Innovation_Outside_PlantNote: we have been revealing in recent blog posts the top 40 innovations made by CommScope (or one of its acquired companies) as part of our 40th anniversary celebration. We continue today by revealing an innovation from the final grouping of innovations—the top 10—which are being announced in alphabetical order. These are our all-time greatest product and technology innovations. You can also review the complete list of innovations we’ve revealed so far and read more about the overall program and selection process in this November 4 post.


Doing More with Less: Decisions to be Made in 2017

Posted by Steven Abraham on December 20, 2016

Note: The following has been submitted as a guest post to CommScope Blogs by Steve Abraham, senior manager of Equinix Infrastructure Services (EIS) at Equinix. Opinions and comments provided in this guest post, as with all posts to CommScope Blogs, are that of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of CommScope.

I just returned home from the CommScope “Expect More” road show, presenting on the future of technology and answering questions about the industry as a whole. What I discovered is that customers still have plenty of questions about emerging multi-tenant data center trends.


Top 10 CommScope Innovations: Category 6 and Category 6A Cabling and Connectors

Posted by Luc Adriaenssens on December 19, 2016

Top_40_Innovation_Cat6

Note: we have been revealing in recent blog posts the top 40 innovations made by CommScope (or one of its acquired companies) as part of our 40th anniversary celebration. We continue today by revealing an innovation from the final grouping of innovations—the top 10—which are being announced in alphabetical order. These are our all-time greatest product and technology innovations. You can also review the complete list of innovations we’ve revealed so far and read more about the overall program and selection process in this November 4 post.


Can You Trust Optical Drop Connectors?

Posted by Mark Alrutz on December 16, 2016

Optical Connectors

A coaxial drop plant, which includes the coaxial drop cable, connectors and other RF passive and active components, has been a maintenance challenge for decades. The majority of subscriber disruption and truck rolls can be attributed to the coaxial drop plant, and most of the time the problem found is at the F-connector interface. The F-connector has improved over the years, but remains craft sensitive.  The connector must be properly applied, the cable properly prepared and the interface adequately tightened. Even then, moisture, pollution and dissimilar metals can lead to issues over time.

What about optical connectors? Does a maintenance team need to anticipate similar service degradations and trouble calls? The answer is a resounding no. You can trust optical drop connectors.


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