CommScope’s Solution Business Partner community is an extremely important aspect of how our products get into the hands of end users. In the case of In-Building Wireless solutions, these business partners often utilize their design expertise to position solutions for specific customer verticals or applications. A great example of this type of positioning with end clients is InnerWireless, who specializes in enabling in-building mobile communication. InnerWireless has solutions for several industry applications, including healthcare.

A recent blog post by Kevin Swank of InnerWireless explains how Cook Children’s is addressing the growing need for a pervasive infrastructure that supports multiple wireless mediums. Check it out here. There are numerous other examples of how enterprises are successfully addressing the challenges of providing wireless within their facilities, including complex scenarios such as hospitals.

 How are you tackling the explosion of wireless connectivity requirements in your building? What examples do you have to share? 

 

About the Author

Jason Reasor

Jason Reasor is a Senior Product Line Manager at CommScope, focusing on Enterprise Copper Solutions. Previously, Jason was a Product Manager with responsibility for strategic healthcare solutions. Prior to joining CommScope, Jason spent 12 years with Hewlett-Packard and Tango Networks in various Product Management, Sales Engineering, R&D Management and R&D Development positions. Jason holds a BS in Computer Engineering from Texas A&M University and an MBA from The University of Texas at Dallas.

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Comments

1 comment for "Healthcare Facilities Require “Medical Grade” In-building Wireless"
David Hoglund

The term "medical grade" is a marketing term that has been used by various companies to include Cisco Systems, Inc. for a number of years. It is very loosely defined, thus driven by marketing. The author has written various test plans and protocols that have allowed medical devices to obtain FDA 510k approval when operating over a wired or wireless medium. In essence the term "medical grade" involves ensuring a quality of service and security for that medical device on an enterprise network regardless of the infrastructure. Should then the infrastructure provider be a part of the validation and verification process for a FDA 510K submittal as well as be a part of the risk management process under IEC 80001? If the infrastructure provider can ensure this, then the term "medical grade" could apply.

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